The Tao of Death

Aug 1, 2017 | Tao du Jour

“When Chuang Tzu was about to die, his disciples expressed a wish to give him a splendid funeral. But Chuang Tzu said, “With the heavens and earth itself for my coffin and shell; with the sun, moon, and stars as my burial regalia; and with all creation to escort me to the grave—are not my funeral arrangements already well in hand?”

“We are afraid the vultures will eat the body of our master,” said the disciples. To this Chuang Tzu replied, “Above ground I shall be food for vultures; below I shall be food for worms and ants. Why rob one to feed the other?”

Chuang Tzu, translated by Herbert A. Giles

(Photos courtesy of Pixabay)

The Tao of the Death

Aug 1, 2017 | Tao du Jour

When Chuang Tzu was about to die, his disciples expressed a wish to give him a splendid funeral. But Chuang Tzu said, “With the heavens and earth itself for my coffin and shell; with the sun, moon, and stars as my burial regalia; and with all creation to escort me to the grave—are not my funeral arrangements already well in hand?”

“We are afraid the vultures will eat the body of our master,” said the disciples. To this Chuang Tzu replied, “Above ground I shall be food for vultures; below I shall be food for worms and ants. Why rob one to feed the other?”

Chuang Tzu, translated by Herbert A. Giles

(Photos courtesy of Pixabay)

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